Comments on Profile Post by zegh8578

  1. zegh8578
    zegh8578
    Every last bird on earth come from a single common ancestor, anchored far into "advanced" bird evolution. Ostriches, for example, are not closer to Ostrich-like dinosaurs, and chickens do not represent any closer relationship than say ducks or crows.
    Dec 9, 2021
    TorontoReign likes this.
  2. zegh8578
    zegh8578
    The fixation on T-rex in dino-to-bird-transition is also entirely misguided, and based on pop science short-cuts, as Tyrannosaurids did not at all evolve flight, and only a *single* branch of Theropod went the bird-route. We are always talking about single points of evolution branching out.
    Dec 9, 2021
    TorontoReign likes this.
  3. zegh8578
    zegh8578
    This means, not even Velociraptor *led to* birds (especially since Velociraptor lived 70 million years ago, and first flight evolved about 150 million years ago, more than double the age!)
    Instead, birds evolve from something *very similar* to Velociraptor, from the mid-late Jurassic. All birds! And no T-rex.
    Dec 9, 2021
    TorontoReign likes this.
  4. TorontoReign
    TorontoReign
    That post belongs in the dinosaur thread.
    Dec 9, 2021
    zegh8578 likes this.
  5. zegh8578
    zegh8578
    I'll probably bring it up again in the future :v It's a bit of a pet peeve, and one paleo-peeps on twitter were discussing in a thread, pop-science has made the overly specific 'T-rex-to-chicken-analogy' into a commonly held belief among the public.
    Dec 9, 2021
  6. Walpknut
    Walpknut
    But T-rexes were fluffy and fat like giant turkeys!
    Dec 9, 2021
  7. zegh8578
    zegh8578
    WELL, Tyrannosaurid family is bracketed well within feathered Theropods, and early smaller forms were fluffy, up untill the 6-7 metre size range, where later giant forms appear to be naked/scaly.
    Dec 9, 2021
  8. zegh8578
    zegh8578
    (In another random fun fact - despite reputations, the Tyrannosaurid family mostly consists of small to medium lanky-legged, long-snouted oddballs, sometimes with crests and stuff. T. rex belongs to a later advancement of bulky, stubby-legged, tiny-armed giants)
    Dec 9, 2021
  9. Walpknut
    Walpknut
    But did they have the thing with the exposed jaw muscle like in Jurassic Park or was that just to make them look evil on the movie?
    Dec 9, 2021
  10. zegh8578
    zegh8578
    The visible jaw-muscle is based on crocodile/alligator anatomy. It has indeed been popularized mostly by paleo-artists of the 80s and 90s, like Greg Paul who also hugely influenced the movie. Theropods could very well have had protruding jaw-muscles similar to a crocodile, but most dinos would have well developed cheeks and skin hiding all that stuff.
    Dec 9, 2021
  11. Walpknut
    Walpknut
    Were they cute dino cheeks?
    Dec 9, 2021
  12. zegh8578
    zegh8578
    A big debate lately, that has artists involved as well, is wether or not Theropod teeth would be visible, with the mouth closed. Pop-culture has popularized the crocodilian teeth-showing, while most scientific consensus is entirely obscured teeth, as with varanuses. Some dinosaurs, such as small raptors, would possibly not expose their teeth even with their jaws agape.
    Dec 9, 2021
    TorontoReign likes this.
  13. Walpknut
    Walpknut
    So what you are telling is that Pokemon has a more realistic depiction of a T-rex than Steven Spielberg?
    Dec 9, 2021
    TorontoReign likes this.
  14. zegh8578
    zegh8578
    They are ahead of the curve
    Dec 9, 2021