Tesla's 'Death Ray'

Discussion in 'Fallout 3 Discussion' started by Jack the Anarch, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. Jack the Anarch

    Jack the Anarch First time out of the vault

    9
    Nov 21, 2006
    For those of you who don't know what the topic title refers to check the article here, and for those of you who know I've a question:

    'How do you feel about having a Death Ray device playing a pivotal or somewhat less, but still significant role in a hypothetical Fallout 3 game?'

    (Proposed scenario: A death ray battery grid was installed prior to the war to defend USofA from strategical droppings of ill intentioned thermonuclear conflagration, but due to the apt work of inside sabotage agents (cough, of very competent engineers) , the system was disabled and failed to do it's intended assignment. Now the threat (in some time after Fallout 2 storyline) of a nuclear weapon in hands of a diabolical sex-deprived madman looms over the reawakening wasteland's echo of a 21st century's civilized life, with only the stories of an anteconflagratory device of immemorial heritage giving any hope of survival (other than breaking in to the impenetrable hut and chopping off the psycho's button pressing fingers.) )
     
  2. Vox

    Vox Vault Dweller

    760
    Jul 18, 2006
    I am no scientist but after reading this it seems like it's pretty vulnerable to the EMP of a nuclear strike.

    That might be the main problem with the whole theory about Fallout 3 and the 'dethz rayz' of Tesla.

    But despite that, a very interestig link.

    Tkanks for that.
     
  3. Sander

    Sander This ghoul has seen it all
    Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Jul 5, 2003
    It's easy to shield such a device from EMP, that wouldn't be a problem.

    However, this would be somewhat silly. It would essentially mean that there'd be more ways to go and destroy the planet than just bombing it to hell, so why wasn't that used?
     
  4. Vox

    Vox Vault Dweller

    760
    Jul 18, 2006
    After some research on Tesla I found out that heaps of his technological miracles were ignored and forgotten.
     
  5. Sander

    Sander This ghoul has seen it all
    Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Jul 5, 2003
    Good for you.
    And now what?
    Also note that out of all those heaps of 'miracles' almost none were actually proven.
     
  6. Vox

    Vox Vault Dweller

    760
    Jul 18, 2006
    True. Still interesting.
    And what would be humanity without mad scientists?! :farnsworth:
     
  7. Brother None

    Brother None This ghoul has seen it all
    Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Apr 3, 2003
    Who says it wasn't? Remember, the Fallout timeline around the end of great war is extremely murky. It is actually NEVER clarified who fired first and with what weapons, though it is known by the after-effects that a significant number of nuclear weapons and/or dirty bombs were used.

    Including 50's death rays in weapons fired around the time would not be a stretch of the imagination. Especially not as Tesla is one of the things included in Fallout lore because his fits in 50's sci-fi so well.

    Good find, good idea.
     
  8. Sander

    Sander This ghoul has seen it all
    Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Jul 5, 2003
    Very true, but in this case they had been in war or on the verge of war for years and actively trying to take over anything to do with fossil fuels. It wouldn't make much sense for them not to use it sooner, since such a weapon could decimate China in seconds. Although I suppose you'd still have the MAD problem.


    True, but come on, a Death Ray with that potential? How are you going to encorporate that into Fallout well other than historically?

    Then again, come to think of it, it could make for an excellent bunker exploration a la the Vats.
     
  9. Jack the Anarch

    Jack the Anarch First time out of the vault

    9
    Nov 21, 2006
    To Sander and Kharn. I wasn't sure how powerful Tesla's Death Ray was supposed to be, or could it's defensive potential have been used as a tool of aggression as well, so I looked it up. Here's what I found:

    You can find the whole article here.

    Here's a bottled down theoretical glimpse at what Tesla might have had in mind when he talked about the "Machine to end all wars": http://www.americanantigravity.com/graphics/tesla/Tesla-Death-Ray-Reconstruction.pdf

    Thus the 'Death Ray' of Nikola Tesla could have looked much more closer in operation to the Tesla Coil of 'Red Alert' games than to the beam weapons we immediately associate with the notion of a 'Death Ray'. Either way, it would be impressive, to say the least.
     
  10. uziel

    uziel Look, Ma! Two Heads!

    355
    Feb 5, 2005
    I think that before we think of the ending, we need to think of a beginning. It's nice and all to have an end, but you usually see the beginning more often when it comes to video games. But I do like the notion and the idea. Perhaps the main character could be one of said madman's lackeys...?
     
  11. Sander

    Sander This ghoul has seen it all
    Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Jul 5, 2003
    Who said it would need to be an ending or even a part of the story of a new game?
    Also, constructing the ending first allows you to work towards that ending, which is also a way of writing that works.
     
  12. uziel

    uziel Look, Ma! Two Heads!

    355
    Feb 5, 2005
    It can also lead to sloppy writing and hasty development from my personal experiences. I've seen some writings with the end result determined first and then the rest has been haphazard and ended abruptly.
    [Example: The Prequel Star Wars trilogy.]
     
  13. Sander

    Sander This ghoul has seen it all
    Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Jul 5, 2003
    Not if the writer is actually good.
    Aside from that, because of the nature of great RPGs this is very different. There are more contingencies to take into account, so they are forced to properly think every possibility through.
     
  14. Brother None

    Brother None This ghoul has seen it all
    Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Apr 3, 2003
    It's not really much of an option to do it in much of another way for branching RPGs, though, uziel. If you have a branching, freeform storyline, you'll have to determine both the end and the start before you determine the middle, otherwise you're going to end up having to throw half your written material away.
     
  15. uziel

    uziel Look, Ma! Two Heads!

    355
    Feb 5, 2005
    I suppose that would be more feasable if there were multiple writers.
     
  16. E

    E It Wandered In From the Wastes

    107
    Nov 14, 2006
    My not really very humble opinion,

    Too many small/medium problems with having a grid of tesla deathrays.
    To get enough coverage to stop a bomber you need alot of towers/masts/antennas and the fallout setting is post apocalyptic with the country blown to shite.

    You need LOTS of electricity for a single "death ray cannon" which again doesn't really fit.

    if the setting is post Fallout 2 then the tech of that nature is getting really shabby, new and adapted technologies seem to be the direction taken in fallout 2.

    That being said the Tesla theories on broadcasted power could be a good "Game winner" fire up the big generator and the remains of "good ol' Uncle sam's" bomber defenses fire up when they get the signal.

    i.e. This amazing "Computer" controlled fighter can fly for ever, Keeping you safe, it's electric motor is kept supplied with power by the tesla mast you see in the back ground.
    (Edit second thoughts on a computer controlled aircraft, computer controlled AA gun?)

    That begs the question. What kind of AntiAircraft defences exist in fallout?

    Too much tesla stuff means there is no reason for all the powered armour, lasers, miniguns and the other meaty goodness of fallout.

    For a nuke to be delivered in fallout it has to be delivered by someone as I recall there are no ICBM's.
    For nuke delivery think "doctor strangelove" so instead of someone with their finger on the button you get someone who is on the radio to their bomber crew.
    (Now who's regretting not having "persuasion" tagged)

    Edit
    Tesla Deathray might work on a smaller scale
    "we need to get the powerstation and its defences online before "evil guy" and his army gets here, and turns the whole place into a giant A-bomb. Why did they build this place on a fault line?"
     
  17. Jack the Anarch

    Jack the Anarch First time out of the vault

    9
    Nov 21, 2006
    Good thoughts E. Just a few remarks here:
    While the USofA did not field an ICBM during the fifties, the story was different on the other side of the ocean. In 1957. the Soviet Union had test fired its first ICBM, the R-7 Semyorka rocket.

    The missile had become operational in 1959. but was soon replaced with more capable second generation ICBMs.

    More on Tesla's Death Rays by the man himself:
    - Nikola Tesla (letter to J. P. Morgan, Jr. on November 29, 1934)

    Tesla claims that only a dozen or so of his projectors are to be placed on the coast to achieve a sufficient coverage as to repel any invading air force. Other than that, your reasoning seems well placed, as power shortages could cause problems, but not so as to disable the entire defense Grid. A single Tesla death ray wouldn't need that much power, since it was proposed in 1937 when all they had were hydroelectric and thermal power plants with limited power distribution capabilities.

    Since you mention Tesla's wireless energy transport, it's fair to say that he also proposed what is now called a Free Energy collector harnessing the neutrino radiation the Earth is being bombarded with on a daily basis giving us a fueless electric generator.
     
  18. Brother None

    Brother None This ghoul has seen it all
    Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Apr 3, 2003
    Irrelevant, there are no ICBMs in Fallout. We're talking Fallout's history here, not ours.
     
  19. Jack the Anarch

    Jack the Anarch First time out of the vault

    9
    Nov 21, 2006
    You are obviously more knowledgeable than I in these matters, but the only thing I can agree with you is that there is no mention of ICBMs in Fallout, but from that truth it doesn't by any means follow that there in fact were no ICBMs in the Fallout universe. In fact, as far as I am aware of course, there is very little mention at all of how the nukes were delivered. Can you please elaborate on why you believe there were no ICBMs and if so, how then were the nukes delivered and where in the game can I find reference to this.
    Thanks.
     
  20. Sander

    Sander This ghoul has seen it all
    Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Jul 5, 2003
    No, there are no ICBMs in Fallout because they don't fit either the technology (no transistors) or the basis of the setting (50s retro sci-fi).

    While theoretically possible within Fallout's technological setting, it's highly unlikely and would require huge facilities vulnerable to attack (like the ICBMs of the 60s).

    Aside from that, the setting is very important as well. I suggest you go watch Dr. Strangelove to grasp why this doesn't really fit the setting.