Post-Apocalyptic books

Discussion in 'General Discussion Forum' started by TamaNeko, Apr 8, 2003.

  1. Roshambo

    Roshambo Antediluvian as Feck

    Apr 3, 2003
    Didn't you understand it the first time, genius? Okay, listen up, because if you fail to understand this, I'm banning you on principle.

    You didn't give enough fucking information for anyone to know where to begin looking for whatever the hell it is you're looking for.
     
  2. TomCo

    TomCo First time out of the vault

    15
    Dec 6, 2005
    Anyway, back on topic.

    Many years ago (about 7 or 8 I think) my dad bought me a book called
    'Firebolt' for my birthday. Its completely brilliant and after reading this thread I’ve dug it out from beneath a pile of software engineering course notes and I have it beside me.

    Basically its set a little outside (later) the time frame of fallout (no one can remember a war, or a before time), from the perspective of two 'Tribals' who set out to rescue their fathers from 'Slavers' (The Orelord and his minions). Before they set off they visit an old man (a pre-war soldier, age unknown) who maintains a weapons cache. The highlight of which is the Firebolt, a highly destructive energy weapon controlled by the power of thought which has the power to corrupt its user.

    There are a lot of nice details in the book (like the map on the inside cover) and a lot of things are tantalisingly hinted at but ultimately left up to your imagination.

    The author is Joe Buckley, and if you can get your hands of a copy I cannot highly recommend it enough. Might be hard to get it though as its an Irish book by an Irish author (I’ve never even seen it in a shop here so I cant imagine the situation being any better outside the country of origin) and information is sparse on the internet.

    Anyhoo, I’m going off to bed to read it right now - ill scan the first chapter if there's any interest.
     
  3. Fredrik

    Fredrik First time out of the vault

    7
    Dec 7, 2005
    There's a book called "After the flood" by the scandinavian author Per Christian Jersild which I've read and it was quite good. It was alot darker if you compare it to the Fallout setting and it felt kind of "realistic".

    If I remember correctly the book is about a man who is about 30 years old and that's very rare because almost no new children are born since all women have become sterile from the radiation. The rest of the humanity is almost 40-50 years old and not many memories (if any) remain of the world before the war. The book is a bit depressing because there is absolutely no light in the end of the tunnel. The book is quite good though and worthy of a closer look.

    Nevil Shute's On the Beach has been mentioned here already and rightly so as well as Stephen King's The Stand. 800 pages of post-apocalyptic goodness!
     
  4. Stampede

    Stampede First time out of the vault

    30
    Sep 12, 2003
    I didn't much care for the Postman. David Brin needs to learn to show, not tell. When Powhatan showed up, I was hoping the book would become a little more interesting, as I found him to be a more likeable character than The Postman, who was basically a con man at heart. Too bad the second he decides to DO something, the book is over.

    If we're throwing in comics, Earth X (the original, not the spinoffs) is a pretty good... it's not post-apocalyptic, but it strikes me as a lot like what the FO world was like just before the bombs fell. Everything is filthy, everyone is hungry, and nothing ever seems like it will get better. Pre-apocalyptic, maybe?
     
  5. Zoidberg

    Zoidberg First time out of the vault

    17
    Jan 29, 2005
    Sounds like the age we live in now :(
     
  6. Dream is dead

    Dream is dead First time out of the vault

    22
    Dec 23, 2005
    I don't know for others, but I'd really appreciate it.
    sounds interesting :)
     
  7. Volkov

    Volkov Still Mildly Glowing

    227
    Jul 30, 2004
    Maybe I just missed it, but I thought someone would have mentioned "The Chrysalids" by John Wyndham. Probably the only PA book I've ever read, apart from the first Dark Tower book.
     
  8. quietfanatic

    quietfanatic Ancient One

    Dec 10, 2003
    Is it good? I might get it from the library and read it soon.
     
  9. Volkov

    Volkov Still Mildly Glowing

    227
    Jul 30, 2004
    Yes, I believe it is. I highly recommend it. I don't really know how to summarise it, but it's a kind of futuristic version of the Salem witch hunts, but with mutants instead of witches.

    Incidentally, due to the numerous recommendations made in this thread I plan to buy a few Deathlands books soon. Are any in particular better than others, or should I just start from the beginning of the series?
     
  10. Morpoggel

    Morpoggel Water Chip? Been There, Done That

    809
    Feb 21, 2005
    Ah yes, the Chrysalids. Got it from the library yesterday, along with Day of the Triffids. Both two great post-apocalypticish books.
     
  11. TomCo

    TomCo First time out of the vault

    15
    Dec 6, 2005
    Sure,

    Ill get on that tomorrow morning.
     
  12. quietfanatic

    quietfanatic Ancient One

    Dec 10, 2003
    The Chrysalids was very good, similar in style to the Triffids, with a frontier atmosphere that actually reminded me more of the Dark Tower series than the Crucible. It is a short book too, so it is a very easy read. I was also reminded of the Edenists in the Night's Dawn Trilogy by Peter F. Hamilton, which is pure sci-fi adventure, but still well worth reading, even though it isn't really post-apoc.
     
  13. Yamu

    Yamu Le Fromage Vieux oTO Moderator Orderite Board Cop oTO

    Jul 26, 2003
    Most of my A-listers (Earth Abides, Canticle, Bloodmoney, By The Waters of Babylon) have already been called out, but there are a few less substantial titles I enjoyed that as of yet haven't been touched on:

    No Blade of Grass, by John Cristopher: The story of the complete biological failure of the world's agriculture and of society's subsequent and rapid implosion, focused through the lens of one man's struggle to get his family across anarchic England to the relative safety of Grandfather's farm. By no means as sunny-funny as topical synopsis makes it sound, this 1956 novel is actually quite dark compared to other P-A fiction of the period, with the survivors quickly realizing that the only moral rubric of any import is what's good for them and theirs. I found it's projection of societal collapse to be quite plausible.

    Dark December, by Alfred Coppel: Like most 50's-70's PA Sci-Fi, this one deals with-- SURPRISE!!-- one man's journey across a semi-wasted land to find his family. There is a tad bit of a spin, with our protagonist having spent the war underground as a missile technician lobbing u-235 at the other guys and accumulating whatever guilt issues that might entail, but mostly, the only thing that makes this novel notable in any degree is how typical it is. The recently postwar landscape, inhabitants, and encounters, and even the very PROSE of the book, are all solidly middle-of-the-road, and it makes absolutely no pretense whatsoever of morbidity or complexity. While the setting of the story wasn't anywhere near as ruined as the New California wasteland we all know and love, there were times when I was just overwhelmed by how much reading Dark December made me feel like I was playing through one of those shallow 4-Intelligence do-gooder runs through Fallout, and for that reason alone it brought a smile to my face. It's no masterpiece, but it's a fun, cheesy read, if you're into that sort of thing.

    The Last Man On Earth, Collected Short Stories, Edited by Isaac Asimov: As with most anthologies, the individual stories are hit-or-miss, but overall I found it to be quite enjoyable. There are enough good reads, and enough novel (or at least little-used) angles on the end of humanity, to make it worth tracking down.
     
  14. TomCo

    TomCo First time out of the vault

    15
    Dec 6, 2005
  15. Dude101

    Dude101 Vault Fossil
    Modder

    Aug 3, 2005
    I am really desperate for more fallout!! so desperate in fact I have been reading heavily PA books.

    I am on the last in the Doomsday warrior books now (book 19) I have managed to get though the 18 others. These books are hard to get.

    I have read loads of others: some Endworld, Lots of Deathlands (really good stuff), 48 and The Wild Shore (great book).

    I have loads more Deathlands and Endworld to get though now.

    This site: http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/nuclear/a.htm has a more complete lis of books thanwww.pamedia.com[/url]
     
  16. AllNamesAreTaken

    AllNamesAreTaken First time out of the vault

    1
    Sep 23, 2006
    I don't think the book "When the Wind Blows" has been posted. It's a pretty sad short story told in children's storybook type way about an old couple slowing suffering the effects of radiation poisioning. You can find it on the internet, because I've seen it before
     
  17. .ICBM.

    .ICBM. First time out of the vault

    31
    May 7, 2006
    Guys, stop what you are doing right now and read this book:



    The awesome cover with relief and shiny bloodstains alone is enough to buy this book. :shock:

    It is about The undead, The living dead, 'Zack', Ghouls, aka: Zombies. Just like Max Brooks' former book; 'The Zombie survival guide' where he predicted an class 4 apocalyptic outbreak of the zombie virus 'Solanum'.

    It happens for real this time, it starts in China where the dense population + bad intelligence + human stupidity results in an catastrophic zombie outbreak wich grows exponentially and cannot be stopped anymore. For example as US forces try to stop millions of zombies wich was a few days before the population of New York City. They try and stop them with the full might of modern weapons, tanks, bombers and thousands of soldiers but they are simply not doing enough damage, and it turns into a nightmare. (e.g. you can shoot tank shell size holes in zombies but they will still come at you crawling)
    I will not spoil any more but rest assured, humanity will get it's ass kicked (or bitten) realy, really hard.

    The individual tales of horror are very tense and nasty, no one is spared as the globe is turned undead. Humanity is showing it's flaws in dealing with this catastrophe wich sometimes result in barbary and fighting along themselves.

    If you are a fan of Romero's apocalyptic zombie movies or a fan of humanity's demise in general, buy it! The only drawback is that at some point you will see the last page..
     
  18. monsharen

    monsharen Testament to the ghoul lifespan
    Staff Member Admin Orderite Board Cop oTO

    Apr 2, 2005
  19. Yamu

    Yamu Le Fromage Vieux oTO Moderator Orderite Board Cop oTO

    Jul 26, 2003
    Normally I'd cry "gravedig," but that's probably one of the single most useful things I've ever found on these forums. Thanks a lot.

    *saved to desk*
     
  20. Foul Ole Ron

    Foul Ole Ron First time out of the vault

    53
    Apr 5, 2007
    The Chrysalids, read it years ago and loved it, read isobelle carmody's "obernewtyn" not that long ago and thought whoa Déjà vu, change the names of the main characters and make it a 6 book series and somehow it's not plagiarism???? well i suppose if you copy from many it's called research eh? EH?? :?

    me...